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Lies, Misinformation, and Disinformation: The Basics

Helpful definitions and tips for identifying fake news and understanding what it means to live in a post-truth world.
Truth is so obscure in these times and falsehood so established that unless we love the truth, we cannot know it.                                                                                                                                                                                 ~Blaise Pascal (17th Century)

Links & Resources

Fact Checking Sites

How to Spot Fake News

How to Spot Fake News Infographic - details in text below image

How to Spot Fake News - ​IFLA: International Federation of Library Association

Consider the source

Click away from the story to investigate the site, its mission, and its contact info

Read beyond

Headlines can be outrageous in an effort to get clicks. What's the whole story?

Check the author

Do a quick search on the author. Are they credible? Are they real?

Supporting sources

Click on those links. Determine if the info given actually supports the story.

Check the date

Reposting old news stories doesn't mean they're relevant to current events.

Is it a joke?

If it is too outlandish, it might be satire. Research the site and author to be sure.

Check your biases

Consider if your own beliefs could affect your judgment.

Ask the experts

Ask a librarian or consult a fact-checking site.

Don't Get Spun by Internet Rumors - FactCheck.org

Tips for Sorting Through Information

  • Read, watch, and listen to information from MULTIPLE sources.
  • Don't take opinion and commentary at face value, always QUESTION assumptions.
  • Check your own biases. Ask yourself WHY you feel the way you feel and remember feelings aren't facts
  • Be OPEN to different and new perspectives.
  • You are entitled to your own opinions but NOT your own facts. 

Image result for post-truth image

Post-Truth and Related Concepts: An Introduction

News Quality Graphic

RECENTLY, THE ACRL PUBLISHED  A BLOG POST CRITICAL OF THE MEDIA BIAS CHART.  TO READ MORE ABOUT THE CONCERNS AND THE ARGUMENT THAT THE CHART IS MORE OF A MEME THAN A USEFUL INFORMATION LITERACY TOOL, GO TO THIS WEBPAGE: https://acrlog.org/2021/02/23/complex-or-clickbait-the-problematic-media-bias-chart/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=complex-or-clickbait-the-problematic-media-bias-chart

 

While this is not a solid scientific classification, it is, nonetheless, a helpful graphic to identify the quality of news media outlets.

Found some propaganda on facebook

Credit

I would like to give credit to Joe Hardenbrook of Carroll University.  Most of the information used to create this guide is from his libguide made for Carroll's Library.

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